PGP Keys

PGP is one of the de-facto standards for encryption. Since January 2000, I've been using GNU Privacy Guard, the complete and free replacement for PGP.

Golden Key Campaign

I have used a few GPG Keys: 0xF2FEBB36 from until May 2002, 0x2C71D63D until January 2011 and now 0xFB1BA7E9. Please download FB1BA7E9.asc or look up the PGP.com keyserver entry for 0xFB1BA7E9.

Key management is the hardest part of any cryptographic system, and PGP/GPG is no exception. Feel free to contact me to arrange verification of my fingerprint or to arrange for me to sign your key.

$ gpg --fingerprint 0xFB1BA7E9
pub   4096R/FB1BA7E9 2011-01-13
      Key fingerprint = 3476 7E02 6D97 8AFA A180  4E77 6F37 C732 FB1B A7E9
uid                  Mark John Suter <suter@zwitterion.org>
uid                  Mark John Suter <suter@zwitterion.humbug.org.au>
uid                  Mark John Suter <suter@humbug.org.au>
uid                  Mark John Suter <mark.suter@member.sage-au.org.au>
uid                  Mark John Suter <mark@suter.name>
uid                  Mark John Suter <suter@member.fsf.org>
uid                  Mark John Suter <mark.suter@acsmail.net.au>
uid                  Mark John Suter <mark.suter@miju.com.au>
uid                  [jpeg image of size 3473]
sub   4096R/86865D02 2011-01-13

Please pay attention to the verifications (it's what makes the web-of-trust work). If you are not completely confident with the web of trust, read the Validating other keys on your public keyring section of the The GNU Privacy Handbook.

I have some tools to help with Key Signing Parties and have used them in the past:

https://zwitterion.org/keys/ updated by Mark Suter on 2017-01-18. Copyright | Privacy